Skip to content

A Profound Lack of Symbolism and Coded Communication in Art Today

December 14, 2009

Well-known artists, now long since gone, frequently utilized symbolism and coded communications in their work. Picasso and Da Vinci immediately come to mind.

There are many reasons artists included symbolism or embedded messages in their paintings: some used art as a form of cryptograph; others used symbolic code to hide esoteric secrets; some to further their careers, to promote a person or a cause, or to communicate covertly with like-minded individuals.

For the most part, art today lacks this substance, intrigue and mystery. Many of the greatest paintings of all time were created with obscurity as their foundation.

Where has the creative edge of intrigue and masterful-mystery in art gone? Are modern day artists not as talented or creative as their predecessors?  Are artists today simply attempting to cater to a creativity-numbed, cookie-cutter, great unwashed society?

This post was written as a challenge to artists – an invitation to sit in front of the easel today and create something entirely unique; a painting full of mystery, intrigue and obscurity. Let the next piece you paint include both symbolism and coded communication. Allow yourself to create your masterpiece.

Here is a collection of works from artists on DiscoveredArtists.com who are “pushing the envelope” with symbolism and covert messaging. Can you decipher their code?

Woman with birds by Ruben Cukier
SEA BREEZE by Angus  Macpherson
Woman with Birds
By:
Ruben Cukier
SEA BREEZE
By:
Angus Macpherson
Girl with Lamb by Ralph MacDonald

Feast of the Divine by Maggie Stewart

Girl with Lamb
By:
Ralph MacDonald


“Feast of the Divine”
By: Maggie Stewart


He Loves Me He Loves Me Not by Niki Sands
In The World 1 Basra and Amagansett by Eleanor Gilpatrick

He Loves Me He Loves Me Not
By:Niki Sands


In The World 1 Basra and Amagansett
By: Eleanor Gilpatrick


The Mask by Alan King
ONCE UP ON A TIME... by Sunita Dixit

The Mask
By:Alan King


ONCE UP ON A TIME…
By: Sunita Dixit


Advertisements
7 Comments leave one →
  1. December 26, 2009 11:07 am

    Absolutely agree with you that there’s been a great lack of symbolism in Contemporary Art.

    Perhaps that is because Conceptual Art by definition tends to make any use of symbolism rather difficult as the whole of the work is a symbol for the idea it provokes.

    Yet Conceptual and Word Art helped lead to my work, which is Post Conceptual Art. I am founding a new theory of Post Conceptual art and then a branch of that known as UnGraven Image. Both use symbols as strokes. The meaning is not inherent in the narrative (which can also use symbols as Da Vinci did). The meaning of a Post Conceptual artwork is inherent in its strokes.

    Thanks for this blog.I had not actually considered the ongoing non Post Conceptual Art lack of symbolism previously.

    Judy Rey Wasserman
    On Twitter : @judyrey

  2. December 28, 2009 9:16 am

    Thank you for your comment, Judy. Words of wisdom. We’ve been following you on Twitter for a while now.

    What is your overall sense of selling artwork online? We sell a great deal of work, but are always looking to increase sales for all of our artists.

    Do you have any thoughts on the Internet and its role in the future of art sales?

Trackbacks

  1. A Profound Lack of Symbolism and Coded Communication in Art Today «
  2. A Profound Lack of Symbolism and Coded Communication in Art Today « «
  3. A Profound Lack of Symbolism and Coded Communication in Art Today «
  4. A Profound Lack Of Symbolism And Coded Communication In Art Today | Dating Tips
  5. A Profound Lack Of Symbolism And Coded Communication In Art Today « art.sierrasnowgear.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: